Welcome to the Julian (Cider & Perry) Juice Market:

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Cider (apple) Juices

Perry (pear) Juices

A link to more information about the types of apples (and their juices) sold through this site can be found here: http://juliancidermarket.com/apple-classification-tables/. Also, we have found The New Cider Maker’s Handbook, by Claude Jolicoeur, helpful. The first Cider Maker’s Handbook, by J. M. Trowbridge, is out of print, but available though Google books digitally.

 

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Good cider is a much greater rarity than good wine, which I will admit is scarce enough. Few Americans, indeed, have ever tasted a perfect cider. This is a strange fact, in a country so blessed as this is with an abundance of apples, and where the general intelligence and inventive genus of the people are so great, and where all the necessary mechanical appliances have been brought to such a high perfection and convenience that the older nations seek after and copy them; yet, with all these advantages three-fourths, yes probably nine-tenths, of all the cider is utterly spoiled, either in the process of making or immediately after becoming cider, and is totally unfit for human consumption, as well as entirely unmerchantable.  …   For all purposes for which wine is commonly used, cider, properly made, has much to commend it over many wines. The principal difference between them lies in the lighter alcoholic strength of cider and in the absence therefrom of tartaric acid, which is the principal acid of wine. Tartaric acid combines with lime to form precipitates, or insolubly particles, whenever they are brought into contact.  Now, as nearly all food contains lime, such contact occurs nearly when wine is drank, especially if it be tart wine. The precipitates thus formed are not always carried off though natural channels, and it is to this cause that certain disorders prevalent among wine-drinkers, such as gout, articular-rheumatism, and kidney difficulties, have been attributed. Cider is certainly free from this objection, since it contains no tartaric acid, the place of which is supplied in the apple by malic acid. The latter acid id also found in grape juice, with tartaric, but it has not the power to form precipitates with lime like tartaric. Malic acid is the principal acid in cranberries, rhubarb, cherries, and also a component of a large number of the most wholesome fruits and plants.”

J. M. Trowbridge, The Cider Maker’s Hand Book1917